About Contributor

Paul Bischoff

Paul Bischoff is an American multimedia journalist based in Beijing. He co-founded and authored the now-retired Beijing Tech Report, and has also worked at the Xinhua News Agency and a local ABC TV station in the US. He’s generally against writing about himself in the third person, but occasionally makes exceptions. You can follow him on Twitter @pabischoff.
We actually spotted it on WeChat Moments first, but most of these photos are from Weibo.

Commented 2 months ago on

Can you pass the belly button test? Meet the sexy new meme sweeping China
I actually interviewed ABP for a story awhile back and they told me to get whitelisted, ads must fulfill a series of certain criteria i.e. no popups, acceptable placement, and being clearly labelled, etc. But yeah, that is how they make their money. My article here --> https://www.techinasia.com/adb...

Commented 2 months ago on

Online users are blocking ads: Will ad-reliant businesses die?
Hi Lotus, apologies for the broken links. It seems the ending parentheses were included in the URL, so just delete them and they should work. The NYT piece is called "Crackdown on Bloggers is Mounted by China," and the TiA piece about the Harvard study is called "Individuals have free speech, groups are gagged: Harvard study shines light on China’s internet censorship"

Commented 2 months ago on

Decoding China’s censorship: How does its Internet panopticon work?
Hi Lotus. Thanks for posting. I think the ambiguity you mentioned comes from the fact that every social network and news media in China self-censors. It's not done by a single government body, though there are "internet police" who intervene when they have to. So there's some variation between them.However, there does seem to be a few guidelines to decide what is and isn't censored (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09..."This week, China’s highest court and prosecution office issued guidelines for defining and punishing online rumors and slander. The rules gave some protection to citizens who accuse officials of corruption, but they also said a slanderous message forwarded more than 500 times or read more than 5,000 times could earn convicted offenders up to three years in prison."And a Harvard study shows the censors tend to concentrate their efforts on groups rather than outspoken individuals (https://www.techinasia.com/ind..."Chinese people can write the most vitriolic blog posts about even the top Chinese leaders without fear of censorship, but if they write in support of or opposition to an ongoing protest—or even about a rally in favor of a popular policy or leader—they will be censored."In other words, it has more to do with volume rather than specific key words.

Commented 2 months ago on

Decoding China’s censorship: How does its Internet panopticon work?
Charlie's response pretty much covers it, but I'd like to add that's its the nature of western news media to hone in on bad news. It just sells better than good news, so unfortunately I don't think the general nature of China coverage is about to change any time soon. Here's a good article that shows how American media tends to portray China as a "fantasy land" to create contrast between our perceived opposing cultures: http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

Commented 2 months ago on

We need to change the way we talk about China’s internet
I've seen a couple similar devices successfully crowdfunded in China. Wonder how they compare...This one came out about a year ago: http://www.demohour.com/projec...

Commented 2 months ago on

With a simple touch, this gadget analyzes your skin and tells you how to improve it
How do you see bitcoin's role shaping up in the Philippines? How does it stack up against local emoney alternatives like the epeso and Vmoney?

Commented 2 months ago on

AMA about the Philippine market and its startup scene! #StartupPH
First of all, there's no such thing as a "celebrated LinkedIn influencer." Thank God Facebook is doing this initiative and not fucking LinkedIn.Secondly, to say that poor people will be "fooled and shortchanged into believing that they're getting the free internet" shows how little you really think of poor people. They aren't stupid. They just don't have money. If the real internet is everything it's promised to be, then you should trust in them and market forces to buy into the real internet if one day they do make enough money. If anything, Internet.org will give them a taste. They'll want more, and not be complacent with "0.0000002% of it."Osman's thoughts reflect my own: https://www.techinasia.com/int...Internet.org in many ways is bad for competition, no doubt. But what's good for business isn't always what's good for people. An internet for the poor is still better than no internet at all.

Commented 2 months ago on

Here’s why I’m welcoming Zuckerberg’s Internet.org with open arms
Agreed. Article talks a lot about why Singapore is superior to US and Europe, but Hong Kong seems just as much if not more on the up-and-up when it comes to fintech. And it has a much bigger stock market, if that's indicative of anything.

Commented 2 months ago on

10 reasons why Singapore is the next big city for fintech
In this case, I think it's mainly to do with the fact that they both own the dominant online mapping services in their respective markets. It serves as a core asset when developing an autonomous vehicle. Also, Baidu and Tencent aren't doing it, so there's not much local competition.

Commented 2 months ago on

Baidu to unveil autonomous car prototype later this year
Great first article, Rohan!

Commented 2 months ago on

Baidu to unveil autonomous car prototype later this year
Your avatar totally tricked me.

Commented 2 months ago on

What would Google have to do to return to China?
Google's share of search revenues was 36%, but it's share of total searches hovered around 20% and was falling in 2009 http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/st...

Commented 2 months ago on

What would Google have to do to return to China?
Google still does sales in China for just that reason, actually. As for maps, in my experience Baidu Maps is far superior. Google Maps doesn't really work cuz of GFW and isn't that good when it does work.Correct me if I'm wrong, but AdSense is one of the only Google services that isn't blocked in China.

Commented 2 months ago on

What would Google have to do to return to China?
IMO, for Google Play...First off, Google would have to brown nose the government and promise it a fully-localized (read: censored) version of Google Play separate from the rest of the world. The relevant authorities would have to agree and Google would delegate staff to monitor and approve all the apps on the store. The whole reason Google left China in the first place was because it refused to censor its search results, so it seems dubious the company would do this. Apple does it, however, so it might not be so far-fetched.Next, Google must convince phone manufacturers to ditch their deals with local alternative Android app stores and use Play instead. There are about five major app stores in China with dozens of smaller ones, many of which are white-labelled solutions made for specific phone brands. Some of the most popular are run by local web giants that are not easily displaced, like Tencent and Baidu.

Commented 2 months ago on

What would Google have to do to return to China?
... or you could use a garden hose. Seriously, how often do people actually wash their scooters/motorcycles?

Commented 2 months ago on

India’s washing machine for bikes rides on funding from iconic investor Mark Mobius
Lots of fist shaking, few punches.

Commented 2 months ago on

Beijing tells Didi Kuaidi its private car services are illegal
Woops, guess that investment never actually went through. Corrected the article. Thanks for pointing it out.

Commented 2 months ago on

Chinese travel site Qunar nabs $500M investment, refuses Ctrip’s acquisition offer
Good variety of opinions on why western tech companies usually fail in China. I think a few years ago, lack of cultural awareness was definitely an issue, but I'm not so sure it's as relevant a factor today. There are localization companies set up to specifically handle those sorts of problems, and there's a wealth of information/consultants out there on the Chinese internet market and how to tackle it. But by the time western companies figured all this out, most of the big opportunities were gone.

Commented 2 months ago on

Why Western companies fail in China