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Swagg Sec Hacks China Telecom, Releases 900+ Admin Login Details

Western hacking collective Swagg Security has hacked the network of China Telecom, one of China’s biggest telecom providers and ISPs, and released more than 900 admin logins and passwords on The Pirate Bay, according to the collective. In a public pastebin post made earlier today, the collective writes:

Hacking China Telecom, was as simple as we assumed it would be. As BBC reported, China and Brazil are the most vulnerable to a cyber attack. I assume China neglected the international news source’s article. China Telecom’s SQL server had an extremely low processing capacity, and with us being impatient, after about a month straight of downloading, we stopped. However, a few times we accidentally DDoS’d their SQL server. I guess they thought nothing of it, until we left them a little message signed by SwaggSec. They realized they were hacked, and simply moved their SQL server. No changing of admin passwords, or alerting the media. At any moment, we could have and still could destroy their communication infrastructure leaving millions without communication.

It certainly sounds like Telecom wasn’t exactly prepared for this sort of attack. And the trouble for Telecom may not be over. Swagg Security has shared the logins it acquired publicly via a torrent file, and is encouraging users to log into their severs and screw with them:

In the torrent below, you will find over 900 admin users for China Telecom. The login for this resides at http://www4.chinatelecom.com.cn/sxgz/login.jsp and we encourage you, the people, who China Telecom ignored, to access and tamper with their data. The torrent also contains a more in depth statement about China Telecom, and all their databases and tables.

China Telecom has not yet released an official statement, but we’re guessing that unofficially there is an awful lot of cursing (and, one imagines, some firing) going on in Telecom’s IT department right now. Although it’s probably not much consolation, at least the company isn’t alone; Swagg Sec also hacked the systems of Warner Brothers.



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