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Codlo: A Tiny Device That Helps You Cook

codlo

Cooking is definitely one of the things people should be able to do, but it’s quite a rare skill. I just stumbled upon Codlo (pictured right), a gadget that can help you cook ingredients at a precise temperature. Built by two Malaysians who are living in the UK, Grace Lee and Xi-Yen Tan, the nice-looking Codlo device is after crowdfunding on Kickstarter and so far it’s halfway towards the $100,000 goal.

It seems quite simple to use Codlo. You plug it into a power socket, set the temperature and time, and put the temperature probe in your normal water-filled cooking pot. Then seal your ingredients inside a bag, and put them into the pot as shown below. It is called the sous-vide cooking technique, which is mostly done by professional chefs.

Grace says that Codlo’s aim is to make sous vide cooking simple and accessible to all. She believes that there are a few things that sets Codlo apart from other cooking gadgets: affordability, ease of use, a patent pending fluid algorithm which can get commercial quality precision temperature, as well as a sleek and compact design. You might notice it looks a lot like Nest, the web-connected home thermostat.

In terms of pricing, FoodCannon says that the regular sous-vide appliances cost around $372 to $1,342, while Codlo’s retail price is $192. There is actually a similar startup called Nomiku building its own affordable home sous-vide cooking thermometer and that has been funded from Kickstarter too. But the latter machine is twice as expensive and some would say that it doesn’t look as elegant as the Codlo.

Grace says Codlo will be made available in Asia after a successful Kickstarter campaign.

It’s always great to see a startup aiming to go global with a new product. For more information about how Codlo can help you cook better meals, or if you want to help them with some crowdfunding and get early bird price for Codlo, then you need to head over to Kickstarter.

codlo food

(Editing by Steven Millward and Anh-Minh Do)



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